|   | 
Details
   web
Records
Author (up)
Title Research brief : using a wiki to support student nurses learning discipline-specific health terminology Type Journal Article
Year 2014 Publication Nursing Praxis in New Zealand Abbreviated Journal
Volume 30 Issue 1 Pages 42-43
Keywords Wiki; Health terminology; Student nurses
Abstract Determines whether a collaborative exercise using a wiki to teach terminology to student nurses results in better learning. Creates a glossary of health terms, using a wiki to aid student learning while providing an environment in which students develop collaborative skills.
Call Number NZNO @ research @ Serial 1491
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up)
Title Dementia care: A literature review Type Journal Article
Year 2001 Publication Vision: A Journal of Nursing Abbreviated Journal
Volume 7 Issue 13 Pages 33-36
Keywords Dementia; Nurse-patient relations; Quality of health care; Nursing; Education
Abstract This article defines dementia, and explores recent trends in relation to why it is such a misunderstood condition in the health care setting. Within a theoretical framework of literature development, nurse client relationships, and quality of care and attitudes are analysed. Gaps, inconsistencies and consistencies are outlined, with the implications for nursing practice and education explored.
Call Number NRSNZNO @ research @ Serial 1279
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Abel, S.
Title Midwifery and maternity services in transition: an examination of change following the Nurses Amendment Act 1990 Type
Year 1997 Publication Abbreviated Journal University of Auckland Library
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords
Abstract
Call Number NRSNZNO @ research @ 318 Serial 318
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Adams, J
Title Life Experience for an Adolescent with Type 1 Diabetes: Nursing Strategies to Support a Healthy Lifestyle Type Journal Article
Year 2012 Publication Whitireia Nursing Journal Abbreviated Journal Available through NZNO library
Volume Issue 19 Pages 18-26
Keywords Diabetes Mellitus Type 1; Psychosocial Factors -- In Adolescence; Diabetic Patients- Life Experiences; Nursing Role
Abstract This article explores the impact a chronic illness has on an adolescent patient, their family, and social, work, cultural and spiritual aspects of their life. The discussion will focus on the patient's healthcare experience and the nursing strategies undertaken to help maintain her optimum health. The personal information used in this article was gathered from an interview with the patient during a second-year undergraduate nursing student clinical learning experience.
Call Number NZNO @ research @ Serial 1381
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Adams, K.
Title A postmodern/poststructural exploration of the discursive formation of professional nursing in New Zealand 1840 – 2000 Type
Year 2003 Publication Abbreviated Journal Victoria University Library
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords History of nursing; Careers in nursing; Nursing philosophy
Abstract This study examines the discursive formation of professional nursing in one country, as revealed by the history of nursing in New Zealand. Michel Foucault's approach to historical research signifies a different level of analysis from conventional approaches, focusing not on the history of ideas but on an understanding of the present, a history of the present. A genealogical method derived from Foucauldian poststructuralism reveals how different understandings of nursing have occurred and have governed nursing practices and scholarship in different historical contexts. The archaeological investigation in this study reveals two moments of epistemic transformation, that is, two intervals of mutation and discontinuity. The Nightingale era in the 1880s precipitated the first epistemic shift – premodernism to modernism. The transfer of nursing education from hospital based training to the tertiary education sector, followed by the introduction of the baccalaureate degree, precipitated the second epistemic shift in the 1990s, the advent of postmodernism. Encompassing these two epistemes, six historical contexts are identified, where significant disruptions to the nursing discourses overturned previously held assumptions about what constituted a nurse. Each historical context is identified by specific discursive constructs. The first is colonial caring, the second the Nightingale ethos and the third heroic, disciplined obedience. In the fourth context, nursing is framed by, and within, discourses of skilled, humanistic caring, in the fifth, scientific, task focused managerialism, and in the 1990s, the sixth context, by multiple realities in an age of uncertainty.
Call Number NRSNZNO @ research @ 1258 Serial 1243
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Adams, S.
Title Nursing people with dual diagnosis in the community setting Type
Year 1997 Publication Abbreviated Journal Massey University Library
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords
Abstract
Call Number NRSNZNO @ research @ 238 Serial 238
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Adams, Sue; Carryer, Jenny; Wilkinson, Jillian Ann
Title Institutional ethnography : an emerging approach for health and nursing research Type Journal Article
Year 2015 Publication Nursing Praxis in New Zealand Abbreviated Journal
Volume 31 Issue 1 Pages 18-26
Keywords Institutional ethnography; Ruling relations; Nurse practitioners; Health research; Sociological inquiry
Abstract Introduces institutional ethnography as an approach to sociological inquiry for health and nursing research in NZ. Provides an overview, introducing key concepts, and describing how institutional ethnography is used in research on the establishment of nurse practitioners and their services in rural primary health care.
Call Number NZNO @ research @ Serial 1499
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Adams, Sue; Cook, Catherine; Jones, Mark
Title Jocelyn Keith's prescient question about the human right to health and healthcare Type Journal Article
Year 2021 Publication Nursing Praxis in New Zealand Abbreviated Journal
Volume 37 Issue 1 Pages 14-18
Keywords Human rights; Health care; Health equity; Maori health
Abstract Reflects on a paper by Jocelyn Keith delivered at the conference of the Australian and New Zealand Association for the Advancement of Science, entitled 'The Right to Health or the Right to Health Care'. Places the article in the context of the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, 2006, the UN Declaration of the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. 2007, and the WHO Sustainable Development Goals, 2015. Considers the need to redress disparities in health in relation to the Health and Disability Systems Review, 2020.
Call Number NZNO @ research @ Serial 1684
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Adams-Smith, P.H.
Title An exploration of issues of primary health services for Taranaki Te Atiawa children based on the expectations and perceptions of their female caregivers Type
Year 2002 Publication Abbreviated Journal http://hdl.handle.net/10063/75
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords Parents and caregivers; Primary health care; Access; Maori; Children
Abstract The intention of this research is, through collaborative discussion and selective conversations, to explore female caregivers' expectations and perceptions of primary health services for some Te Atiawa Maori children. The research process was developed in a partnership between the Maori women participants and the researcher. In addition, two local kuia actively participated in and supported the process. Emancipatory critical social theory underpinned and informed the project. Power relationships between the researcher and the participants can be overtly explored within this theoretical framework. In terms of this particular exploratory study, participatory research appeared to be applicable. The participants are female caregivers of Te Atiawa children. Data collection was done using group interactions and semi-structured interviews in the winter of the year 2000. A thematic analysis of the data was used, in which common themes were identified, compared and discussed. From the analysis of the data of the participants' conversations, key ideas were identified. The major findings have been identified within two main themes. These are: a concept of health is not the same for Pakeha as for Maori, and access issues are still problematic for the participants in this study. Many quotes from the interview participants are included in order to keep the focus of the project on the voices of the women interviewed. In terms of the significant contribution of this research, this study aims to allow voices of female caregivers of Te Atiawa Maori children to be heard. Individual and collaborative interactions offer insights into what is important to them in terms of Maori child health. Clearly, the primary health initiatives promoted by the New Zealand government are not reaching at least some of the people for whom they are intended. The research participants offered their ideas as to how these deficits could be remedied in their community.
Call Number NRSNZNO @ research @ Serial 1216
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Adamson, M.J.
Title Action research: the journey from enrolled nurse to registration and beyond. Discovering a process to promote self-efficacy and professional development Type
Year 1997 Publication Abbreviated Journal Victoria University of Wellington
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords
Abstract
Call Number NRSNZNO @ research @ 219 Serial 219
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Ainge, N.
Title Registered nurses participation in a professional recognition program. Their responses to nine job related factors Type
Year 1993 Publication Abbreviated Journal Mary Lambie Collection, Canterbury Medical Library
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords
Abstract A simple descriptive longitudinal survey monitoring self- reported incidence of satisfaction/ dissatisfaction to nine job related factors. The two hundred RN's participating in the pilot implementation of the Clinical Career Pathway (Canterbury Area Health Board) were surveyed in June 1992 and February 1993. This was a time of change in New Zealand's Health service
Call Number NRSNZNO @ research @ 13 Serial 13
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Ainge, N.
Title Report on the pilot implementation of the clinical career pathway for nurses ( CAHB) Type
Year 1993 Publication Abbreviated Journal Mary Lambie Collection Canterbury Medical Library
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords
Abstract During 1992, two hundred Registered Nurses ( RN's) participated in the Pilot Implementation of the Clinical Career Pathway for Nurses. This was conducted according to terms for the Proposal (Shepherd et al 1991) prepared by Nurses throughout the Canterbury Area Health Board.Ten services had a participating ward/ unit. All were volunteers. The framework for a Clinical Career Pathway (CAHB) has six steps. During 1992 attention was focused on the two levels beyond basic functional competency. Nurse Practitioner II, Nurse Specialist. An open system was piloted. There was no change to remuneration. Advancement was- self initiated; by peer review ( the RN was required to meet the performance criteria set by the Unit Nurse Managers.) There was no constraint to numbers advancing. Forty seven RN's advanced to Nurse practitioner II level,nine advanced to Nurse Specialist level.Evaluation covered four areas-1. Qualitative benefits and initiatives to improves patient care. 2. Nurses perception of the project. 3. Benefits of peer review. 4. Secondary gains
Call Number NRSNZNO @ research @ 93 Serial 93
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Alavi, C.
Title Breaking-in bodies: Teaching, nursing, initiations or what's love got to do with it? Type Journal Article
Year 2005 Publication Contemporary Nurse Abbreviated Journal
Volume 18 Issue 3 Pages 292-299
Keywords Nursing; Education; Psychology; Nurse-patient relations; Students
Abstract This paper discusses how students become able to work with sick patients for whom they may feel disgust or discomfort. It is a sustained engagement with the literature on abjection and disgust and is not the outcome of evaluation research. It considers the role of problem-based learning pedagogy in facilitating students' negotiation of their own discomfort and horror, and describes experiences which enable them to approach abject patients with more comfort and less disgust. The paper argues the importance of creating spaces where students can explore issues which are distressing and disturbing so that they will feel able to remain in nursing.
Call Number NRSNZNO @ research @ Serial 658
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Alcorn, G.
Title The youth health specialty in New Zealand: Collaborative practice and future development Type Journal Article
Year 2007 Publication New Zealand Family Physician Abbreviated Journal The Royal New Zealand College of General Practitioners website
Volume 34 Issue 3 Pages 162-167
Keywords Adolescents; Community health nursing; Primary health care; Nurse practitioners; School nursing
Abstract This paper details the workforce capacity of youth health nursing and medical staffing required for community-based and school-based youth health services. The author shows how youth health services seek to complement the care delivered by Primary Health Organisations (PHOs) and other allied health care services in the community. She outlines the development and operation at VIBE, a community-based youth health service in the Hutt Valley with school-based youth health services delivered at four low deciles secondary schools. She explains that developing workforce capacity for youth health services is a primary health care priority and an important means to address inequalities and to improve the health services of young people.
Call Number NRSNZNO @ research @ Serial 518
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Alcorn, G.
Title Giving voice to school nursing as a primary health care specialty Type
Year 2001 Publication Abbreviated Journal ResearchArchive@Victoria
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords School nursing; Primary health care; Cross-cultural comparison
Abstract The purpose of this thesis is to give voice to school nursing as a primary health care specialty, and to promote the development of school nursing in New Zealand. School nursing is an invisible practice specialty that is largely funded from within the education sector, to address the health needs of student clients. School nursing is a significant primary health care initiative that can positively influence student health outcomes. The author presents her own school nursing practice experience and philosophy, prior to reflecting upon the history of school nursing, and the health concerns present within the student population. The work then moves to review and critique school nursing literature from New Zealand, Australia, the United Kingdom, and the United States. This thesis highlights the need for collaborative policy and practice development initiatives including a legislative requirement for school nurses, school nursing competencies and standards, school nurse to student ratios, postgraduate training, professional liaison, practice funding, and research. A discourse on the reflective topical autobiographical method introduces autobiographical poetry from school nursing practice and reflective inquiry, as the central research endeavour of this thesis. Autobiographical poetry is offered as a window to this specialty practice, and accompanying reflections allow access to a further layer of practice knowledge.
Call Number NRSNZNO @ research @ Serial 1143
Permanent link to this record